• Banana5

    Corto Maltese page 3

  • corto-slide-2

    Corto Maltese page 2

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  • The Shadow Killer Preview!

    Check out this exclusive preview of Jerome K. Jerome Bloche’s first adventure in…”The Shadow Killer!”

  • A Fable of Venice

    The lion statues guarding the Venice Arsenal are an important part of the city’s history. The lions—and the inscriptions on them— also play a key role in Hugo Pratt’s Corto Maltese adventure, Fable of Venice. Simone Castaldi, our Corto co-translator, was in Venice recently and went to check out the lions first hand to see if they really have Arabic writings on them, as described in Pratt’s homage to his home town. Simone reports, “There is indeed some sort of writing, but it’s so faded that you could make it into whatever you want it to be, which I think is the spirit of the Corto story in the first place.”

    Fable of Venice will be on sale in August.

  • The sea travels in both directions

    In addition to our buying the rights to translate European comics into English, we also sell the rights to Europeans to translate Library of American Comics and other IDW books. Francesco Meo of Editoriale Cosmo in Italy just loves classic American newspaper strips!

  • Dinner in Angoulême

    We had the pleasure of seeing Rubén Pellejero and his wife Mercè at a dinner with the fine folks at Casterman, where Rubén also introduced us to Juan Diaz Canales, his co-creator on the new Corto Maltese stories.

  • Meet Jérôme K. Jérôme Bloche!

    09_2017_jeromebloche1

    We’re happy to announce the first English language publication of  an ongoing series that has long been a hit with adult and young adult readers in Europe. Jérôme K. Jérôme Bloche is a two-time winner of Angoulême Festival awards, for Best Series in 2010 and Best Series for the Youth in 1997.

    The series stars an endearing young private-eye-in-training who solves crimes as he scoots around Paris on his trusty motorized bicycle. Carrying his latest lesson in a correspondence course for would-be detectives—not to mention his general clumsiness—he seems, however, more Will Ferrell than Humphrey Bogart.

    Wearing an old trenchcoat and his indispensable felt hat, the 20-year-old Jérôme tries to look the part of a seasoned private eye. By day he translates detective novels and fantasizes about being one. His girlfriend, Babette, is a flight attendant who brings him recordings for his collection of police sirens from around the world. And then, his first “case”: In the past two months, fifteen people have been killed by poisoned darts. All that witnesses saw was a feathered shadow and a blowgun. The job of capturing the flamoyant assassin is entrusted to Jérôme K. Jérôme Bloche by Professor Maison, his mentor and founder of a correspondence course for detectives. Things get off to a rocky start, however, when the professor appears to be victim number sixteen! He beckons Jérôme to come closer as he whispers his suspicion that the culprit is one of the pupils of the correspondence course!

    03_2018_jerome2

  • Paracuellos is “Best of 2016”

    It’s pretty amazing that nearly thirty years after Carlos Giménez first published PARACUELLOS in Spain (in 1977), the first English-language edition, which we published under our EuroComics imprint, has made two Best Comics of 2016 lists:

    In the Beat’s “Best of 2016″ list, Alex Deuben writes:

    “This book by Carlos Gimenez is something of a legend in his native Spain and elsewhere but this year this book was finally published in the US. The story of a child growing up in a state run home in the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War, it begins as the story of one child – Gimenez himself – but becomes something bigger. The story of a generation growing up in a fascist state, run by adults that don’t care whether the children live. This look at childhood in fascist Spain is more than just a great memoir, but an important historical document and one of the powerful and haunting graphic novels I have ever read.”

    At Comic Book Resources, Michael Lorah says:

    “Gimenez tells the stories of his time in the “Social Aid Homes” for war orphans after Franco won the Spanish Civil War. Every page is designed to break your heart. Masterful cartooning, a little childhood whimsy and a whole lot of human tragedy make for an unforgettable reading experience.”