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Corto Maltese

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Corto Maltese:
UNDER THE SIGN OF CAPRICORN

by Hugo Pratt

Translated by Dean Mullaney and Simone Castaldi

TPB, 140 pp., 9.25″ x 11.625″
ISBN:978-1-63140-065-0, $29.99
Includes the first six inter-related short stories Pratt created in France in the early 1970s:

The Secret of Tristan Bantam

Rendez-vous in Bahia

Sureshot Samba

The Brazilian Eagle

So Much for Gentlemen of Fortune

The Seagull’s Fault


 

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Corto Maltese:
BEYOND THE WINDY ISLES

by Hugo Pratt

WINNER OF THE 2016 HARVEY AWARD!

Translated by Dean Mullaney and Simone Castaldi
TPB, 120 pp., 9.25″ x 11.625″

ISBN: 978-1-63140-317-0, $29.99
Includes the second half of Pratt’s “Caribbean Suite”:

Mushroom Head

Banana Conga

Voodoo for the President

Sweet Dream Lagoon

A Tale of Two Grandfathers

“Mushroom Head” begins in Maracaibo, Venezuela, where Corto Maltese and Professor Steiner lead an expedition on the trail of the legendary El Dorado, financed by the antiquarian Levi Colombia. In “Banana Conga,” Corto has his first encounter with the beautiful yet dangerous Venexiana Stevenson. Within this framework of adventure, Hugo Pratt weaves themes dealing with the exploitation of indigenous people, the noble struggle to gain freedom and justice, and how cowardice can poison men of all classes. The action, set in 1917, takes Corto Maltese from the Mosquito Coast to Barbados to a deadly struggle among Jivaro head-hunters in the Peruvian Amazon.

 

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Corto Maltese:
CELTIC TALES

by Hugo Pratt

Translated by Dean Mullaney and Simone Castaldi
TPB, 140 pp., 9.25″ x 11.625″

ISBN: 978-1-63140-507-5, $29.99
The six stories in this volume are set during 1917-1918 against the backdrop of the First World War, as the action moves from South America to Europe. Pratt further explores such complicated themes as patriotism and greed, revolution and opportunism, and betrayal and seduction. “The Angel in the Window to the Orient” opens on a small island in the Venetian lagoon, where Corto resumes his search for the gold of El Dorado, only to come face-to-face with a beautiful—and familiar—blonde spy. Selfish pragmatism and rapacity play out in “Under the Flag of Gold,” as he meets fictionalized versions of Ernest Hemingway and Aristotle Onassis. The fight for Irish independence draws the peripatetic sailor to the Emerald Isle and a young revolutionary named Banshee O’Danann in the delightfully titled “Concerto in O’ Minor for Harp and Nitroglycerin.” Magic realism pervades “A Mid-Winter Morning’s Dream,” Pratt’s tribute to Shakespeare, in a story set at Stonehenge on the plains of Salisbury, where Corto is joined by Morgana, Merlin, Puck, and Oberon to save Britain from the Teutonic invader. “Côtes de Nuit and Picardy Roses” unfolds at the time of the Battle of the Somme in April 1918 that led to the death of Germany’s greatest ace, Manfred von Richthofen, the legendary Red Baron. In the final adventure—“A Burlesque, or Not, Between Zuydcoote and Bray-Dunes”—Corto reunites with an old friend from The Ballad of the Salty Sea and is drawn into a hypnotic tale of espionage in the northern communes of France.

 


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Corto Maltese:
THE ETHIOPIAN

by Hugo Pratt

Translated by Dean Mullaney and Simone Castaldi
TPB, 96 pp., 9.25″ x 11.625″

ISBN: 978-1-63140-696-6, $24.99

When Corto Maltese arrives in the Middle East and Africa in 1918 the shifting sands and loyalties reveal colonial powers still battling for domination over each other and the indigenous people. The desert of Yemen, controlled by the fading Ottoman Empire, is the setting for “In the Name of Allah, the Merciful and Compassionate,” where Corto meets Cush, the Danikil warrior with whom he establishes a close yet conflicted relationship. In “The Coup de Grace” the stubborn racism of an English commander of a small fort in British Somaliland leads to conflict with Cush and the Dervish army of Sayyid Mohamed, whom the British call “The Mad Mullah.” The action moves to Ethiopia amidst inter-tribal conflict in “…and of Other Romeos and Other Juliets,” as Cush introduces Corto to the mysterious and powerful shaman Shamael, who hears the voices of the dead and of devils. German East Africa is the background of “The Leopard-Men of the Rufiji,” where Corto is engulfed in a dreamlike atmosphere that reveals how African justice operates outside the constraints of “white” law.


Corto Maltese:
IN SIBERIA

by Hugo Pratt

Translated by Dean Mullaney and Simone Castaldi
TPB, 96 pp., 9.25″ x 11.625″

ON SALE FEBRUARY 2017

$29.99

With this book Pratt leaves behind the short story form he’d used for twenty-one interrelated tales and presents a truly epic graphic novel. In the aftermath of the Russian Revolution and the First World War, Corto Maltese is engaged by the Red Lanterns—a Chinese secret society made up entirely of women—to find an armored train laden with gold that belonged to the last Russian Tsar, Nicholas II. They aren’t the only ones lusting after the treasure. The adventure, which shifts from the hidden courts of Venice to the mysterious alleys of Hong Kong, from Shanghai to Manchuria and Mongolia to Siberia, also attracts regular and irregular armies, as well as revolutionaries and counter-revolutionaries. The sweeping plot allows Pratt to fully investigate the complicated and competing motivations of his cast that includes the return of Rasputin and the introduction of the cold and dangerous Duchess Marina Seminova, the enigmatic warrior/spy named Shanghai-Lil, and historical figures such as the “Mad Baron” Roman Ungern-Sternberg, a Russian general who sees himself as the modern-day Genghis Khan!